The Source Of The Bucket T Hot Rod

A couple of weeks ago I posted some pictures of one of my favorite hot rods – a Ford Bucket T.  One of those pictures is shown below.

IMG_8699

Ford Bucket T Hot Rod

The other day I was looking at the book “Classic Ford Trucks” that was written by the folks at Consumers Guide in 2013.  In that book they had a photograph of a 1925 Ford pickup truck which reminded me of the Ford Bucket T.  That photograph is reproduced below.

1925 Ford Model T Pickup

1925 Ford Pickup Truck

As you can see, the pickup truck is the base for the Bucket T.  One of the things that I noticed when comparing the Bucket T to the original pickup truck is the difference between the radiator and the cowl is significantly longer in the Bucket T compared to the standard pickup.

This past summer I did see a 1923 Ford Model T at a car show in nearby Holliston, Massachusetts.  That car is shown below.

Ford Model T 1923 (4)

1923 Ford Model T

There was a lot of similarity between the Ford Model T cars and the Ford Model T pickup trucks.  The 1925 light duty Ford trucks were essentially a truck body configuration on a car chassis.

Ford Model T 1923 (2)

This 1923 Ford Model T Had An Interesting Basket Mount

The Ford Model T cars and trucks both used a 176.7 cubic inch (just under 3 liters) flathead four-cylinder engine.  These engines had a compression ratio of only 3.98:1 and produced 20 horsepower.

Ford Model T 1923 (3)

The 20 Horsepower Ford Model T Engine

The Ford Model T cars were very common and many became the base for hot rods.  While the standard performance of the Model T cars was pathetic, when fitted with modern V8 engines they became very fast – maybe too fast for the suspension.

With respect to the standard Model T performance, I once asked a fellow who had a Model T Station Hack just how fast the Model T would go.  He said that it was not a matter of how fast the Model T would go, it was a matter of how fast you could go and still be able to stop it.

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