Addition of a Book About Tazio Nuvolari to My Library

This week I added an interesting book about Tazio Nuvolari to my library.  The book, titled “Nuvolari, Legendary Champion of International Auto Racing”, was written in 1959 by Count Giovanni Lurani, who was very active in the racing community in the era from the 1920s to the 1960s.  For example, he was a class winner at Mille Miglia and Le Mans, and it was Count Giovanni Lurani who was key to developing and promoting the Formula Junior class in the late 1950s.  He was very active in racing at the time Tazio Nuvolari was at his peak, so this should have given him direct, personal knowledge about Nuvolari.

My Newest Addition to My Library

I have only begun to read the book, but it is quite clear that Luriani was an admirer of Nuvolari.  But then who wouldn’t be?  To me, Tazio Nuvolari is the most fascinating driver of the 20th century.  Dr. Ferdinand Porsche called Tazio Nuvolari “the greatest driver of the past, the present, and the future.”

Tazio Nuvolari in a Bugatti Just Before the 1934 Spanish Grand Prix

I have been looking for a book about Nuvolari for some time.  I did see some books about Nuvolari at this year’s Lime Rock Historic Festival, but the prices were just too high for me.

I found the picture below to be interesting, as I have not seen many pictures of Nuvolari after he had retired from racing.  Poor health caused Tazio Nuvolari to retire, but he raced until he could no longer stand it.  Nuvolari won his class in his last race, but he had to be lifted from the car after the race.

The picture below was taken in October 1948 at a Grand Prix race at the Monza race track after the track had just been renovated. Alberto Ascari was just getting started in racing while Nuvolari was retiring.  Nuvolari died at the age of 60 in 1953.

Alberto Ascari and Tazio Nuvolari In 1952

I look forward to reading this book about Tazio Nuvolari and I will share some of the more interesting stories.

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6 Responses to Addition of a Book About Tazio Nuvolari to My Library

  1. Scott says:

    I read it. It’s EXCELLENT!

    • Hi Scott,
      I agree. It is an excellent book about a very interesting person – one of the greatest racers of them all.

      Regards,
      Steve

    • Carlo says:

      The picture showing Nuvolari and Alberto Ascari was not taken at Monza in 1948, but at the aerautodromo di Modena in 1952: You can see part of the control tower at the back (the aerautodromo doubled as a test track for race cars and as an airfield) and is now a park. The rest of the rundown control tower was still there a few years ago. The lady wearing glasses is Rosa Carolina Perina, Nuvolari’s wife, the other lady was Rosina Vincenzi, Nuvolari’s personal nurse (employed by him after suffering his first stroke).
      A further proof that the picture was not taken in 1948 is the car you can see at the back, a Fiat 1400, Nuvolari’s personal car, first put on the marked in 1950.

  2. Scott says:

    P.S. I have seen his 1935 Alfa in action at Pacific Raceway in Kent, WA. It’s something else to hear that car go round the track. It sounds like a ’60’s muscle car. It’s COOL! It’s really neat to go up and look at it in the pits! 😀

  3. Carlo says:

    The picture showing Alberto Ascari and Nuvolari was not taken at the Monza track in 1948, but at the aerautodromo di Modena in 1952, after he suffered his first stroke. At the back you can see part of the control tower (the aerautodromo doubled as a test track and as an airfield) and is today a park. The lady wearing the glasses is Nuvolari’s wife Rosa Carolina Perina and the other lady is Rosina Vincenzi, Nuvolari’s personal nurse (employed by him after he suffered his first stroke). The car at the back is Nuvolari’s personal car, a Fiat 1400. The fact that the Fiat was built in 1950 is a proof of the fact that the picture cannot have been taken in 1948

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